Dance

At KAA we are pleased to offer weekly dance lessons to all KS3 students, followed by elective GCSE and A Level courses. The curriculum is broad, allowing students to experience a number of different dance styles and express their creativity. All students are encouraged to perform and choreograph as they master new skills.

The dance department are proud partners with the Royal Academy of Dance, who offer workshops and support to our students.

Throughout their time at KAA students have the following opportunities –

  • Join Intrepidus Dance Company and compete at regional and national competitions
  • Attend Street Dance Club, run by industry professionals
  • Travel to the Royal Academy of Dance and take part in GCSE workshops
  • Watch a range of West End productions
  • Compete in House Dance

KS3 Dance Curriculum

The Dance curriculum at KAA provides students with an outstanding Dance education, with a focus on developing students’ practical and theoretical skills in the subject through the three components of choreography, performance and appreciation. We are privileged to teach one dance class per week to every student from Year 7 to Year 9 in our state-of-the-art dance studio. We believe that a deep understanding of these concepts are essential in order to achieve excellence in GCSE and A-Level Dance as well as develop confident and enthusiastic Dance students who have a passion for the subject.

The department provides opportunities for students to develop as choreographers, performers and dance critics to a level which will allow them to study the subject at University or follow a career into the dance profession. Even without the ambition to pursue a career in dance, the subject can benefit all students. In dance, we encourage students to foster a  creative and confident mindset that is transferable to all elements of life.

The curriculum has been designed, and is structured around a series of ‘fertile questions’ which are explored over a period of lessons culminating in an assessment at the end of each term.

Year 7 Curriculum

In Year 7 students start by developing their choreographic skills through stimulus work and their understanding of the four core technical skills in dance. They also look at dance styles from around the World, focusing on Street, Gumboot and Bhangra. Students are then introduced to Capoeira and themes of Brazilian carnival as they study the GCSE work A Linha Curva.

 

Year 8 Curriculum

In Year 8 students start by developing their choreographic skills through stimulus work and their understanding of motif and motif development. In the Spring Term students appreciate a range of different musicals. From Aladdin to Hairspray, students learn repertoire and an understanding of how dance enhances they key themes of musical theatre. In the summer term students study hip-hop dance as they are introduced to the GCSE work Emancipation of Expressionism.

 

Year 9 Curriculum

In Year 9 students start by developing their choreographic skills. They are encouraged to question if dance can be a form of protest and work in groups to create detailed choreography that is focused on the use of relationships. During the spring term students look at dance through the ages. They learn the signature styles of the Charleston, Jive and Hop Hop as well as appreciating their cultural impact. In the summer term students prepare for GCSE dance with an analysis of the work Shadows which is inspired by Eastern European history and suffering.


Homework

As dancers must be proficient in both practical and theoretical dance work, it is important that students complete theory homework alongside their practical classes. At KS3, students will receive dance homework once a fortnight. This homework will be on google forms in the form of a 10 question quiz. Students will have the opportunity to test their understanding of key concepts studied in their previous lessons. Students are expected to achieve at least 7/10 on the quiz. However, to encourage resilience they are permitted to complete it more than once.

Looking for ways to improve in Dance?

  • Attend KAA’s dance enrichents (Intrepidus Dance, Street Club, PCA scholars)
  • Take part in one of the KAA shows (Christmas concert, dance showcase, musical)
  • Compete in House Dance
  • Attend dance workshops (Pineapple, Rambert, Laban)
  • Watch live performance (Sadler’s Wells, The Royal Opera House)
  • Visit the school library for books on dance and dance practitioners

GCSE Dance Curriculum

GCSE Dance will help you to develop technical and expressive skills as well as knowledge and understanding of dance through performance, choreography and critical appreciation of dance.

You will actively and physically demonstrate your abilities through the three practical elements of the course worth 60% as well as your theory and understanding of dance in the written paper worth 40%.

The content of the course is designed to allow students to develop technical and expressive skills as well as knowledge and understanding of dance through performance, choreography and critical appreciation of dance.

GCSE Dance isn’t just a subject which trains you to become a dancer, although many students go on to work in this industry. The course also has many transferable skills which can be applied to other subjects to make you more employable in the future. For example, students must practice analytical skills when appreciating professional works. Dance students are encouraged to be expressive, inquisitive, and confident students who can take pride in their work.

Course Breakdown

A Level Dance

The study of dance enables students to develop socially whilst promoting creativity, fitness and well-being. As well as developing as performers, students also develop skills in confidence, self-esteem and team working skills.

Assessment includes a combination of practical dance tasks alongside creative extended writing assignments. This will equip you with the necessary skills and experience to study dance further, or embark on an exciting career in the arts.

The content of the course is designed to allow students to develop technical and expressive skills as well as knowledge and understanding of dance through performance, choreography and critical appreciation of dance.

A Level Dance isn’t just a subject which trains you to become a dancer, although many students go onto work in this industry. The inclusion of detailed analysis, cultural commentary, and extended writing are just a few examples of how the course has many transferable skills which can be applied to other subjects to make you more employable in the future.

Our aim is that all A Level dance students leave KAA with a high level of practical ability and a creative approach to theoretical studies.

Course Breakdown

Year 12

Year 13

Dance Teachers

Mr Dunning – Head of Dance

Ms Nix – Teacher of Dance